Duck Eggs-The New (Traditional) Health Food!

Duck eggs vs Chicken eggs

with pastured bacon sprouted bread and fermented eggplant (2)

Three duck eggs. Notice the large orangey yolks and firm whites.

Duck Eggs are an Alkaline producing food, one of the few foods that leave your body more alkaline which is a great benefit to cancer patients as cancer cells do not thrive in an alkaline environment. Chicken eggs are an acid food leaving your body more acid. According to Nutrition Data, the chicken egg has an inflammation factor of -224. The optimum inflammation factor is  +50, making this egg promote inflammation, another factor in most cancer promoting conditions.

This is your more expensive cage free vegetarian fed chicken egg.   Note the paler yolk and runny white in comparison with the duck egg.

A grocery egg with a lighter smaller yolk, and thin, watery white.

Difference Between Duck and Chicken Eggs

Though chicken eggs are the most commonly used, duck eggs are still catching on as effective alternatives. Much less is known about duck eggs, compared to chicken eggs. So going through this article might just clear all the mystique about it.

Duck Eggs Vs Chicken Eggs: easily distinguishable, a considerably longer shelf life

Omar (hen) and Wacky KaDaffy (drake) foraging for grubs.

Omar (hen) and Wacky KaDaffy (drake) foraging for grubs.

Duck eggs are quite large compared to chicken eggs, which makes them easily distinguishable. Another difference is that the duck egg’s shell is a lot tougher than a normal chicken egg’s shell. Though that makes them a lot more difficult to crack, it is also supposed to provide them with a considerably longer shelf life. By long, I mean six weeks at maximum, if you keep them refrigerated. Still, eating fresh eggs is highly recommended.

The large size of the duck egg gives it a larger yolk to white ratio than a chicken egg. So if you want more yolk, duck eggs are what you should go for. With the larger size, you definitely get more for your money, compared to a chicken egg.

Farm Fresh eggs with a rich smooth orange yolk whether Chicken eggs or Duck eggs will surprise you if you have only experienced the colorless and flavorless supermarket versions. What most people do not know is that Duck eggs are far superior to Chicken eggs with the same taste and richer smoother consistency yet better than a chicken egg in many ways

1. Duck eggs have twice the nutritional value of a chicken egg and stay fresher longer due to their thicker shell.

2. Duck eggs are richer with more Albumen making cakes and pastries fluffier and richer.

3. Duck Eggs have more Omega 3 fatty acids ..something you can actually see in the salted pickled eggs the Chinese love to eat. Omega 3 is thought to improve everything from Brain health to healthy skin and 59 other things according to GreenMedInfo writer Pat Robinson.*

4. Duck Eggs are an Alkaline producing food, one of the few foods that leave your body more alkaline which is a great benefit to cancer patients as cancer cells do not thrive in an alkaline environment. Chicken eggs are an acid food leaving your body more acid.

There is one reason why many people are scared to try a duck egg and that is that the yolk contains about a 1 day supply of Cholesterol ..which is not good for heart diseases..well … This depends on what you believe about weight control and fat or cholesterol. We are only just beginning to understand the real effects of eating fat in our diet. In practice we know that healthy active people who exercise need fat in their diet, otherwise their bodies would generate the cholesterol itself. So good (HDL) cholesterol is good and will stop your body from producing its own cholesterol. Your body needs to know how to process fat and get the energy benefits. If it forgets how to process fat or has easier sources of fast energy as from hydro carbons then guess what, your body stores the fat as an energy source …hence your love handles are really stored energy.

All the above says there are great benefits from eating an egg a day…yolk and all. No YOLK – is not good advice – No Joke!

Egg Allergy Substitutes: One health benefit with duck eggs is that most people who are allergic to chicken eggs are able to eat duck eggs without allergic reactions.

Wacky Kadaffy and Omar's flock 040914

 

Nutrition

6x the Vitamin D,2x the Vitamin A, and 2x the cholesterol in duck eggs vs chicken eggs. Duck contains about 75% of the Vitamin E in chicken eggs. Duck eggs reportedly also have more Vitamin K2, Dr. Westin A Price’s ‘factor-x’.

In 1945, Dr. Weston Price described “a new vitamin-like activator” that played an influential role in the utilization of minerals, protection from tooth decay, growth and development, reproduction, protection against heart disease and the function of the brain. ,

Duck eggs also are higher in calories for the same weight quantity, probably due to it’s slightly higher fat concentration. Also, keep in mind that the eggs of free-range, pastured animals generally have higher levels of vitamins and higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids. The yolks are darker, yellower, indicating a higher nutrient density.

A 100 gm of duck egg will provide about 185 KCal of energy, compared to 149 KCal of energy provided by a chicken egg. Both types of eggs, match each other in terms of carbohydrate content, while the protein content is slightly higher in the duck eggs compared to chicken eggs. The mineral content of duck eggs is very similar. Both contain selenium, manganese, zinc, copper, potassium, sodium, phosphorus, calcium and iron. The duck eggs contain slightly higher amounts of all these minerals.

Same is the case with vitamin content in both of them. The vitamin content too is similar, but duck eggs have a higher amount of each one of them, which includes thiamin, niacin, riboflavin, pantothenic acid, folate, vitamin B6, vitamin D, vitamin E, vitamin A, vitamin B12 and retinol.

100 gm of duck eggs will have about 3.68 gm of saturated fat, compared to 3.1 gm in chicken eggs. The mono unsaturated fat content is about 50% more in duck eggs as against chicken eggs. The amino acid content profile is also similar for both eggs, but again duck eggs contain more of them. The amino acids included are threonine, isoleucine, trytophan, leucine, methionine, lysine, cystine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, valine, serine, glycine, proline, aspartic acid, histidine, alanine, and arginine. The only minus point that duck eggs have is the considerably higher cholesterol content, compared to chicken eggs. 100 gm of duck eggs will contain 884 mg of cholesterol, compared to 425 mg in chicken eggs. That is why, people with history of heart disease should stay away from consuming duck eggs or moderate their intake.

Duck Egg – Chicken Egg Nutrient Comparison

Duck Eggs

Chicken Eggs

Nutrients

Units

Per 100 Grams

Nutrients

Units

Per 100 Grams

Proximates

Water

g

70.83

Water

g

75.33

Energy

kcal

185

Energy

kcal

149

Energy

kj

776

Energy

kj

623

Protein

g

12.81

Protein

g

12.49

Total lipid (fat)

g

13.77

Total lipid (fat)

g

10.02

Ash

g

1.14

Ash

g

0.94

Carbohydrate, by difference

g

1.45

Carbohydrate, by difference

g

1.22

Fiber, total dietary

g

0.0

Fiber, total dietary

g

0.0

Minerals

Calcium, Ca

mg

64

Calcium, Ca

mg

49

Iron, Fe

mg

3.85

Iron, Fe

mg

1.44

Magnesium, Mg

mg

17

Magnesium, Mg

mg

10

Phosphorus, P

mg

220

Phosphorus, P

mg

178

Potassium, K

mg

222

Potassium, K

mg

121

Sodium, Na

mg

146

Sodium, Na

mg

126

Zinc, Zn

mg

1.41

Zinc, Zn

mg

1.10

Copper, Cu

mg

0.062

Copper, Cu

mg

0.014

Manganese, Mn

mg

0.038

Manganese, Mn

mg

0.024

Selenium, Se

mcg

36.4

Selenium, Se

mcg

30.8

Vitamins

Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid

mg

0.0

Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid

mg

 0.0

Thiamin

mg

0.156

Thiamin

mg

0.062 

Riboflavin

mg

0.404

Riboflavin

mg

0.508 

Niacin

mg

0.200

Niacin

mg

0.073 

Pantothenic acid

mg

1.862

Pantothenic acid

mg

1.255 

Vitamin B-6

mg

0.250

Vitamin B-6

mg

0.139 

Folate, total

mcg

80

Folate, total

mcg

47 

Folic acid

mcg

0

Folic acid

mcg

Folate, food

mcg

80

Folate, food

mcg

47 

Folate, DFE

mcg_DFE

80

Folate, DFE

mcg_DFE

47 

Vitamin B-12

mcg

5.40

Vitamin B-12

mcg

 1.00

Vitamin A, IU

IU

1328

Vitamin A, IU

IU

635 

Retinol

mcg

399

Retinol

mcg

191 

Vitamin A, RAE

mcg_RAE

399

Vitamin A, RAE

mcg_RAE

191 

Vitamin D

nl*

nl*

Vitamin D

IU

52.000

Vitamin E

mg_ATE

0.740

Vitamin E

mg_ATE

 1.050

Lipids

Fatty acids, total saturated

g

3.681

Fatty acids, total saturated

g

 3.100

4:0

g

0.000

4:0

g

0.000 

6:0

g

0.000

6:0

g

0.000 

8:0

g

0.000

8:0

g

0.003 

10:0

g

0.000

10:0

g

0.003 

12:0

g

0.000

12:0

g

0.003 

14:0

g

0.000

14:0

g

0.034 

15:0

nl*

nl*

15:0

g

0.004

16:0

g

2.996

16:0

g

2.226

17:0

nl*

nl*

17:0

g

0.017

18:0

g

0.632

18:0

g

0.784 

20:0

nl*

nl*

20:0

g

0.010

22:0

nl*

nl*

22:0

g

0.012

24:0

nl*

nl*

24:0

g

0.003

Fatty acids, total monounsaturated

g

6.525

Fatty acids, total monounsaturated

g

3.809

14:1

nl*

nl*

14:1

g

0.008

16:1 undifferentiated

g

0.441

16:1 undifferentiated

g

0.298

18:1 undifferentiated

g

6.084

18:1 undifferentiated

g

3.473 

20:1

g

0.000

20:1

g

0.028 

22:1 undifferentiated

g

0.000

22:1 undifferentiated

g

0.003 

Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated

g

1.223

Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated

g

1.364 

18:2 undifferentiated

g

0.558

18:2 undifferentiated

g

1.148 

18:3 undifferentiated

g

0.102

18:3 undifferentiated

g

0.033 

18:4

g

0.000

18:4

g

 0.000

20:4 undifferentiated

g

0.319

20:4 undifferentiated

g

0.142 

20:5 n-3

g

0.000

20:5 n-3

g

0.004 

22:5 n-3

g

0.000

22:5 n-3

g

0.000 

22:6 n-3

g

0.000

22:6 n-3

g

0.037

Cholesterol

mg

884

Cholesterol

mg

425 

Amino Acids

Tryptophan

g

0.260

Tryptophan

g

0.152

Threonine

g

0.736

Threonine

g

0.600

Isoleucine

g

0.598

Isoleucine

g

0.682

Leucine

g

1.097

Leucine

g

1.067

Lysine

g

0.951

Lysine

g

0.897 

Methionine

g

0.576

Methionine

g

0.390 

Cystine

g

0.285

Cystine

g

0.290 

Phenylalanine

g

0.840

Phenylalanine

g

0.664

Tyrosine

g

0.613

Tyrosine

g

0.510 

Valine

g

0.885

Valine

g

0.761 

Arginine

g

0.765

Arginine

g

0.749 

Histidine

g

0.320

Histidine

g

0.296 

Alanine

g

0.631

Alanine

g

0.696 

Aspartic acid

g

0.777

Aspartic acid

g

1.255 

Glutamic acid

g

1.789

Glutamic acid

g

1.633 

Glycine

g

0.422

Glycine

g

0.420 

Proline

g

0.480

Proline

g

0.498 

Serine

g

0.963

Serine

g

 0.929

Other

Caffeine

nl*

nl*

Tryptophan

mg

0

Theobromine

nl*

nl*

Threonine

mg

0

USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 15 (August 2002) *nl = was not listed

Freshly harvested duck eggs from my flock.

Freshly harvested duck eggs from my flock.

Duck Eggs Vs Chicken Eggs: Taste & Utility

Duck eggs provide a taste that is different and tastier than chicken eggs according to most users. Individual tastes might vary, so it is best if you try one out to decide! Every thing that you do with a chicken egg, can be done with a duck egg. That includes scrambling them, poaching and baking. In fact, most expert bakers report that using duck eggs makes their cakes rise higher and provides them with excellent taste due to their high fat content. As the water content in duck eggs is lesser than chicken eggs, you need to be careful not to overcook them, which has a tendency to make them rubbery. The larger water content also makes the duck egg white harder to whip but they are worth the effort.

Duck eggs over easy and sunny side up with healthful accompaniments.

Duck eggs over easy and sunny side up with healthful accompaniments.

*61 Benefits of Omega 3 fatty acids in your diet:

  1.  There is strong evidence that omega-3 fatty acids have a beneficial effect in bipolar disorder.
  2. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation is associated with reduced mania and depression in juvenile bipolar disorder.
  3. Clinical studies have reported that oral fish oil supplementation has beneficial effects in rheumatoid arthritis and among some asthmatics.
  4. Fish oil improves tubular dysfunction, lipid profiles and oxidative stress in patients with IgA nephropathy.
  5. Dietary supplementation with flaxseed oil lowers blood pressure in dyslipidaemic patients.
  6. Omega 3 fatty acids improve the cardiovascular risk profile of subjects with metabolic syndrome, including markers of inflammation and auto-immunity.
  7. Omega-3 in modest doses reduces cardiac deaths, and in high doses reduces nonfatal cardiovascular events.
  8. Dietary supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids reduces the incidence of sudden cardiac death in patients with myocardial infarction.
  9. Omega-3 fatty acid reduce the total mortality and sudden death in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction.
  10. Raising blood levels of omega-3 fatty acid levels may be 8 times effective than distributing automated external defibrillators (AEDs), and 2 times more effective than implanting implanting cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) in preventing sudden death.
  11. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation reduces total mortality and sudden death in patients who have already had a heart attack.
  12. Consuming small quantities of fish is associated with a reduction in coronary heart disease.
  13. Omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D supplementation results in a substantial reduction in coronary calcium scores and slowed plaque growth.
  14. Omega-3 fatty acids prevent atrial fibrillation after coronary artery bypass surgery.
  15. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation has a therapeutic effect in children with ADHD.
  16. A combination of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids as well as magnesium and zinc consumption provide a beneficial effect on attentional, behavioural, and emotional problems of children and adolescents
  17. Fish oil supplementation has a significant therapeutic effect on children with autism.
  18. Omega-3 fatty acids appear to be an effective treatment for children with autism.
  19. The consumption of omega-3 fatty acid supplements decreases homocysteine levels in diabetic patients.
  20. Omega-3 fatty acids improve macro- and microvascular function in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.
  21. In patients with stable coronary artery disease, an independent and inverse association exists between n-3 fatty acid levels and inflammatory biomarkers.
  22. Omega-3 fatty acids improve endothelial function in peripheral arterial disease.
  23. Fish oil has a beneficial effect on blood viscosity in peripheral vascular disease.
  24. Fish oil supplementation improves walking distance in peripheral arterial disease.
  25. The omega-3 fatty acid docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) reduces the risk of peripheral arterial diseaseassociated with smoking.
  26. An 8-month treatment with omega-3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA) has a positive effects, such as decreasing inflammation, in patients with cystic fibrosis.
  27. Omega-3 fatty acids may have a protective effect against mucus over-production caused by pulmonary bacterial colonization in cystic fibrosis.
  28. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation reduces inflammatory biomarkers, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and interleukin-8 concentrations in cystic fibrosis patients.
  29. DHA increases resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.
  30. EPA supplementation has therapeutic value in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C patients.
  31. EPA and DHA have therapeutic value in the treatment of systemic lupus erythmeatosus.
  32. Omega-3 fish oil reduces the severity of symptoms in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.
  33. Fish and long-chain omega-3 fatty acid intake reduce the risk of coronary heart disease and total mortalityin diabetic women.
  34. Higher plasma concentrations of EPA and DPA are associated with a lower risk of nonfatal myocardial infarction among women.
  35. Omega-3 fatty acid consumption is inversely associated with incidence of hypertension.
  36. Fish oil, but not flaxseed oil, decreases inflammation and prevents pressure overload-induced cardiac dysfunction.
  37. The consumption of fish reduces the risk of ischemic stroke in elderly individuals.
  38. A moderate intake of EPA and DHA may postpone cognitive decline in elderly men.
  39. Omega-3 fatty acids may have a therapeutic effect on postpartum depression.
  40. Omega-3 fatty acids may have therapeutic value in the treatment of dry eye syndrome.
  41. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation exhibits therapeutic value in the treatment of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptomatology.
  42. Fish consumption reduces the risk of ischemic stroke in men.
  43. Omega-3 Fatty acids supplementation prevents and reverses insulin resistance.
  44. Omega-3 fatty acids prevent the formation of urinary calcium oxalate stone formation.
  45. Omega-3 fatty acids are beneficial for children with bronchial asthma.
  46. Omega 3 fatty acid supplementation may contribute to the prevention of early preterm birth in both low-risk and high-risk pregnancies.
  47. Fish consumption is associated with a 63% reduction in prostate cancer-specific mortality.
  48. Omega 3 fatty acids decrease the severity of autoimmune disorders.
  49. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) may have a therapeutic role in attenuating pulmonary hypertension.
  50. Omega-3 fatty acids resulted in an improvement in weight bearing in dogs with osteoarthritis.
  51. Primary open-angle glaucoma patients have reduced blood levels of DHA and EPA.
  52. Omega-3 fatty acids alleviate insulin resistance and fatty liver in obese mice.
  53. Intake of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids from fish may be associated with a reduced prevalence of allergic rhinitis.
  54. Cod liver oil (omega-3 Fatty Acids) reduces the need for NSAIDs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.
  55. Omega-3 Fatty Acids has significant therapeutic benefits and drug sparing activity in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.
  56. Diets containing EPA and DHA have an inhibitory effect on breast cancer growth and metastasis.
  57. Dietary Omega-3 fatty acids may protect smokers against chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).
  58. Omega-3 fatty acids were shown to be more effective than placebo for depression in both adults and children in small controlled studies and in an open study of bipolar depression.
  59. The omega-3 fatty acid EPA is as effective as fluoxetine (Prozac) in treating major depressive disorder.
  60. A diet low in trans-unsaturated fat and rich in omega-3 fatty acids and olive oil may reduce the risk of age-related macular degeneration.
  61. Higher intake of omega 3 fatty acids may reduce the risk of pneumonia.

    ducks in the hoop house adding fertilizer in January

    ducks in the hoop house adding fertilizer in January

 

 

 

 

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